Burials at Gate of Heaven Cemetery

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  1. Babe Ruth

    Babe Ruth


    George Herman "Babe" Ruth, Jr. (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948) was an American baseball player. Ruth was a Major League Baseball (MLB) outfielder and pitcher for 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. He was one of the first five inductees into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936.

  2. James Cagney

    James Cagney


    James Francis Cagney, Jr. (July 17, 1899 – March 30, 1986) was an American actor and dancer, both on stage and in film, though he had his greatest impact in film. Known for his consistently energetic performances, distinctive vocal style, and deadpan comic timing, he won acclaim and major awards for a wide variety of performances. He is best remembered for playing multi-faceted tough guys in movies like The Public Enemy (1931), Taxi! (1932), Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) and White Heat (1949) and was even typecast or limited by this view earlier in his career. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked him eighth among its 50 Greatest American Screen Legends. Orson Welles said of Cagney that he was "maybe the greatest actor who ever appeared in front of a camera" and Stanley Kubrick considered him to be one of the top 5 best actors of all time.

  3. Sal Mineo

    Sal Mineo


    Salvatore "Sal" Mineo, Jr. (January 10, 1939 – February 12, 1976), was an American film and theatre actor, best known for his performance as John "Plato" Crawford opposite James Dean in the film Rebel Without a Cause. He was twice nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, for his roles in Rebel Without a Cause and Exodus.

  4. Anna Held

    Anna Held


    Helene Anna Held (19 March 1872 – 12 August 1918), known professionally as Anna Held, was a Polish-born French stage performer and singer, most often associated with impresario Florenz Ziegfeld, her common-law husband.

  5. Dorothy Kilgallen

    Dorothy Kilgallen


    Dorothy Mae Kilgallen (July 3, 1913 – November 8, 1965) was an American journalist and television game show panelist. She started her career early as a reporter for the Hearst Corporation's New York Evening Journal after spending two semesters at The College of New Rochelle in New Rochelle, New York. In 1938, she began her newspaper column, The Voice of Broadway, which eventually was syndicated to more than 146 papers. She became a regular panelist on the television game show What's My Line? in 1950.

  6. Peggy Hopkins Joyce

    Peggy Hopkins Joyce


    Peggy Hopkins Joyce (May 26, 1893 – June 12, 1957) was an American actress, artist model and dancer. In addition to her performing career, Joyce was known for her flamboyant life, with numerous engagements, six marriages to wealthy men, subsequent divorces, a series of scandalous affairs, a collection of diamonds and furs, and her generally lavish lifestyle.

  7. Julie Haydon

    Julie Haydon


    Julie Haydon (June 10, 1910 – December 24, 1994) was an American actress who performed on Broadway and in films.

  8. Jimmy Walker

    Jimmy Walker


    James John Walker, often known as Jimmy Walker and colloquially as Beau James (June 19, 1881 – November 18, 1946), was Mayor of New York City from 1926 to 1932. A flamboyant politician, he was a liberal Democrat and part of the powerful Tammany Hall machine. During a corruption scandal he was forced to resign.

  9. Jessica Dragonette

    Jessica Dragonette


    Jessica Dragonette (February 14, 1900 – March 18, 1980) was a singer who became popular on American radio and was active in the World War II effort.

  10. Fred Allen

    Fred Allen


    Fred Allen (born John Florence Sullivan; May 31, 1894 – March 17, 1956) was an American comedian whose absurdist, topically pointed radio show (1932–1949) made him one of the most popular and forward-looking humorists in the Golden Age of American radio.

  11. Bess Houdini

    Bess Houdini


    Wilhelmina Beatrice Rahner (January 22, 1876 – February 11, 1943), better known as Bess Houdini, was the stage assistant and wife of Harry Houdini.

  12. Billy Martin

    Billy Martin


    Alfred Manuel "Billy" Martin (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989) was an American Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. He is best known as the manager of the New York Yankees, a position he held five different times. As Yankees manager, he led the team to consecutive American League pennants in 1976 and 1977; the Yankees were swept in the 1976 World Series by the Cincinnati Reds but triumphed over the Los Angeles Dodgers in six games in the 1977 World Series. He also had notable managerial tenures with several other AL squads, leading four of them to division championships.

  13. Dutch Schultz

    Dutch Schultz


    Dutch Schultz (born Arthur Flegenheimer; August 6, 1901 – October 24, 1935) was a New York City-area German Jewish-American mobster of the 1920s and 1930s who made his fortune in organized crime-related activities, including bootlegging and the numbers racket. Weakened by two tax evasion trials led by prosecutor Thomas Dewey, Schultz's rackets were also threatened by fellow mobster Lucky Luciano. In an attempt to avert his conviction, Schultz asked the Commission for permission to kill Dewey, which they refused. When Schultz disobeyed them and made an attempt to kill Dewey, the Commission ordered his murder in 1935.

  14. Claire Merritt Hodgson

    Claire Merritt Hodgson


    Claire Merritt Hodgson Ruth, born Clara Mae Merritt (September 11, 1897 – October 25, 1976), was a native of Athens, Georgia, United States, who is most famous for having been the second wife of Babe Ruth.

  15. Malcolm Wilson

    Malcolm Wilson


    Charles Malcolm Wilson (February 26, 1914 – March 13, 2000) was the 50th Governor of New York from December 18, 1973, to December 31, 1974. He was a member of the New York State Assembly from 1939 to 1958. He also served in the Navy during World War II. In 1958, he was elected Lieutenant Governor of New York on a gubernatorial ticket with Nelson Rockefeller, and when they won, he served in that position until Rockefeller resigned. Wilson lost the 1974 gubernatorial election to Hugh Carey.

  16. Paul Dixon

    Paul Dixon


    Paul Dixon (1918–1974) was a daytime television personality and talk show host in Cincinnati, Ohio. He originally began his career with radio shows in New York City and Chicago before being enticed to come to then-radio station WCPO in Cincinnati as a news reporter and announcer around 1945. He was chosen best newscaster in Cincinnati in 1947 after conducting an interview with men trapped in a collapsed building in downtown Cincinnati.

  17. Wellington Mara

    Wellington Mara


    Wellington Timothy Mara (August 14, 1916 – October 25, 2005) was the co-owner of the NFL's New York Giants from 1959 until his death, and one of the most influential and iconic figures in the history of the National Football League. He was the younger son of Tim Mara, who founded the Giants in 1925. Wellington was a ball boy for that year.

  18. Ernesto Lecuona

    Ernesto Lecuona


    Ernesto Lecuona y Casado (August 6, 1895 – November 29, 1963) was a Cuban composer and pianist of worldwide fame. He composed over six hundred pieces, mostly in the Cuban vein, and was a pianist of exceptional skill. His father was Canarian and his mother was Cuban.

  19. Bella Dodd

    Bella Dodd


    Bella Visono Dodd (1904 – 29 April 1969) was a member of the Communist Party of America (CPUSA) in the 1930s and 1940s who later became a vocal anti-communist.

  20. Malachi Martin

    Malachi Martin


    Malachy Martin (also Malachi Martin) (c.1831 – 24 December 1862) lived in South Australia in the 19th century and was convicted and executed for willful murder in 1862. Although in most official records his given name is written as “Malachi” it is clear that his parents actually gave him the traditional Irish form of the name, popularised through the veneration of St. Malachy, a twelfth-century Bishop of Amagh.

  21. Fulton Oursler

    Fulton Oursler


    Charles Fulton Oursler (January 22, 1893, Baltimore, Maryland - May 24, 1952, New York City) was an American journalist, playwright, editor and writer. Writing as Anthony Abbot, he was a notable author of mysteries and detective fiction.

  22. Westbrook Pegler

    Westbrook Pegler


    Francis James Westbrook Pegler (August 2, 1894 – June 24, 1969) was an American journalist and writer. He was a popular columnist in the 1930s and 1940s famed for his opposition to the New Deal and labor unions. Pegler criticized every president from Herbert Hoover to FDR ("moosejaw") to Harry Truman ("a thin-lipped hater") to John F. Kennedy. He also criticized the Supreme Court, the tax system, and labor unions. In 1962, he lost his contract with King Features Syndicate, owned by the Hearst Corporation, after he started criticizing Hearst executives. His late writing appeared sporadically in publications that included the John Birch Society's American Opinion.

  23. Mike Quill

    Mike Quill


    Michael Joseph Quill (September 18, 1905 – January 28, 1966) was one of the founders of the Transport Workers Union of America (TWU), a union founded by subway workers in New York City that expanded to represent employees in other forms of transit, and the President of the TWU for most of the first thirty years of its existence. A close ally of the Communist Party USA for the first twelve years of his leadership of the union, he broke with it in 1948. He drove his former allies out of the union as they tried to control the union rather than continue to help it.

  24. T. Vincent Learson

    T. Vincent Learson


    Thomas Vincent Learson (September 26, 1912 – November 4, 1996) was IBM's chairman and chief executive officer from June 1971 through January 1973. He was succeeded by Frank Cary. Both the previous chairman Thomas Watson, Jr. and senior project manager Fred Brooks regarded Learson as the driving force behind the System/360 project, which was huge and risky but whose success ensured IBM's dominance of the mainframe computer market.

  25. Heywood Broun

    Heywood Broun


    Heywood Campbell Broun, Jr. (ˈbrn; December 7, 1888 – December 18, 1939) was an American journalist. He worked as a sportswriter, newspaper columnist, and editor in New York City. He founded the American Newspaper Guild, now known as The Newspaper Guild. Born in Brooklyn, New York, he is best remembered for his writing on social issues and his championing of the underdog. He believed that journalists could help right wrongs, especially social ills.

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