People from Selma, Alabama

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  1. Mia Hamm

    Mia Hamm


    Mariel Margaret "Mia" Hamm-Garciaparra (born March 17, 1972) is a retired American professional soccer player. Hamm played many years as a forward for the United States women's national soccer team and was a founding member of the Washington Freedom. Hamm held the record for international goals, more than any other player, male or female, in the history of soccer, until 2013 when fellow American Abby Wambach scored her 159th goal to break the record. Hamm is also the third most capped female player in soccer history behind Kristine Lilly and Christie Rampone, appearing in 275 international matches. She also holds the national team record for most career assists with 144.

  2. Lillian Lehman

    Lillian Lehman


    Lillian Lehman (born February 12, 1947) is an American actress. She played Lena Hart in NBC's soap opera Sunset Beach, and Dr. Joyce Meadows on ABC's General Hospital. She has also been cast in various guest roles on TV, as well as a starring role in Tenafly and Fay. Lehman is a professor emerita of theatre and graduate of California State University Northridge with a B.A. in theatre.

  3. Michael Johnson

    Michael Johnson


    Michael D. Johnson (born February 7, 1987) is an American football defensive end for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Bengals in the third round of the 2009 NFL Draft and has also played for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. He played college football at Georgia Tech.

  4. Amelia Boynton Robinson

    Amelia Boynton Robinson


    Amelia Platts Boynton Robinson (born August 18, 1911) is an American woman who was a leader of the American Civil Rights Movement in Selma, Alabama and a key figure in the 1965 march that became known as Bloody Sunday. In 1984, she became founding vice-president of the Schiller Institute affiliated with Lyndon LaRouche. She was awarded the Martin Luther King, Jr. Freedom Medal in 1990.

  5. Kenny Brown

    Kenny Brown


    Kenny Brown (born July 5, 1953 on the Air Force base in Selma, Alabama) is an American blues slide guitarist from Nesbit, Mississippi, United States. Skilled in the North Mississippi Hill Country blues style popularized by his mentor R. L. Burnside, Brown began his career by apprenticing with Mississippi Joe Callicott, Johnny Woods, and Mississippi Fred McDowell. He has also cited Muddy Waters, George "Mojo" Buford, Jessie Mae Hemphill, Junior Kimbrough, Johnny Winter, and Johnny Shines as influences. He has recorded one album for the Fat Possum Records label (Stingray), and his most recent double album, Can't Stay Long, was released in June 2011 on Devil Down Records.

  6. Autherine Lucy

    Autherine Lucy


    Autherine Juanita Lucy was the first black student to attend the University of Alabama, in 1956.

  7. Deanna Jackson

    Deanna Jackson


    Deanna Jackson (born December 15, 1979) is an American professional women's basketball player. Jackson attended college at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She competed with USA Basketball as a member of the 2000 Jones Cup Team that won the Gold in Taipei.

  8. Oscar Toney, Jr.

    Oscar Toney, Jr.


    Oscar Toney, Jr. (born 26 May 1939, Selma, Alabama) is an American soul singer.

  9. Benjamin Obomanu

    Benjamin Obomanu


    Benjamin Ebenezer Obomanu (born October 30, 1983) is an American football wide receiver who is currently a free agent. He was selected by the Seattle Seahawks in the 7th round of the 2006 NFL Draft. Obomanu played college football for the Auburn Tigers.

  10. Ralph Jordan

    Ralph Jordan


    James Ralph "Shug" Jordan (/ˈʃʊɡ ˈɜrdən/ SHUUG JURD-an; September 25, 1910 – July 17, 1980) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player and coach of football and basketball. He served as the head football coach at Auburn University from 1951 to 1975, where he compiled a record of 176–83–6. He has the most wins of any coach in Auburn Tigers football history. Jordan's 1957 Auburn squad went undefeated with a record of 10–0 and was named the national champion by the Associated Press. Jordan was also the head men's basketball coach at Auburn (1933–1942, 1945–1946) and at the University of Georgia (1946–1950), tallying a career college basketball record of 136–103. During his time coaching basketball, he also served as an assistant football coach at the two schools. Auburn's Jordan–Hare Stadium was renamed in Jordan's honor in 1973. Jordan was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1982.

  11. Terry Leach

    Terry Leach


    Terry Hester Leach (born March 13, 1954) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher, and author of the book, Things Happen for a Reason: The True Story of an Itinerant Life in Baseball.

  12. Candy Harris

    Candy Harris


    Alonzo Harris (born September 17, 1947 in Selma, Alabama) was a Major League Baseball player for the Houston Astros just at the beginning of the 1967 season (April 13-April 27). He had been signed by the Baltimore Orioles as an amateur free agent before the 1966 season, then drafted by the Houston Astros from the Orioles in the 1966 first-year draft (November 28, 1966).

  13. J.L. Chestnut

    J.L. Chestnut


    J. L. Chestnut (December 16, 1930 – September 30, 2008) was an author, attorney, and a figure in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. He was the first African-American attorney in Selma, Alabama, and the author of the autobiographical book, Black in Selma, which chronicles the history of the Selma Voting Rights Movement, including the 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches and Bloody Sunday. The New York Times review of Chestnut's autobiography says that "As the paradoxical "nigger lawyer," Mr. Chestnut was in a privileged position to see into the souls of white folk."

  14. Cal Ramsey

    Cal Ramsey


    Calvin (Cal) Ramsey (born July 13, 1937 in Selma, Alabama) is a retired American basketball player whose NBA career consisted of thirteen games over the 1959-1960 and 1960-1961 seasons for the St. Louis Hawks, New York Knicks, and Syracuse Nationals. Ramsey is fondly remembered by Knick fans as the color analyst during the late 1970s. Since 1983–84, Ramsey has served as an assistant men's basketball coach at his alma mater New York University (NYU).

  15. Johnny Moore (musician)

    Johnny Moore (musician)


    Johnny Moore (December 14, 1934 – December 30, 1998) was an American rhythm and blues singer with the Drifters.

  16. Bull Connor

    Bull Connor


    Theophilus Eugene Connor, known as Bull Connor (July 11, 1897 – March 10, 1973), served as a Commissioner of Public Safety for the city of Birmingham, Alabama, during the American Civil Rights Movement. A Democrat, Connor's office, under the city commission government, gave him responsibility for administrative oversight of the Birmingham Fire Department and the Birmingham Police Department, which had their own chiefs.

  17. Hosken Powell

    Hosken Powell


    Hosken Powell (born May 14, 1955, at Selma, Alabama) is a former Major League Baseball player who played from 1978 to 1983 for the Minnesota Twins and Toronto Blue Jays. An outfielder, he threw and batted left-handed, stood 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighed 175 pounds (79 kg). He attended Chipola College, Marianna, Florida.

  18. Pat McHugh

    Pat McHugh


    William Patrick "Pat" McHugh (December 21, 1919 – September 19, 2004) was a professional American football defensive back and halfback in the National Football League. He played five seasons for the Philadelphia Eagles (1947–1951).

  19. Jai Miller

    Jai Miller


    Randall Jai Miller (born January 17, 1985) is a former American professional baseball outfielder. Currently he plays for the Alabama Crimson Tide as a walk-on defensive back on their football team.

  20. Mattie Moss Clark

    Mattie Moss Clark


    Dr. Mattie Moss-Clark (born Mattie Juliet Moss; March 26, 1925 - September 22, 1994) was an American gospel choir director and the mother of The Clark Sisters, a world-renowned gospel vocal group. Clark is credited for creating the three-part harmony (separating vocal parts into soprano, alto and tenor), a technique which is prevalent among gospel choirs today.

  21. Clara Weaver Parrish

    Clara Weaver Parrish


    Clara Weaver Parrish (March 16, 1861 – November 11, 1925) was an American artist from Alabama. Although she produced a large amount of work in a wide array of media, she is best known for her paintings and stained glass window designs. She was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame in 1983.

  22. Eunice Walker Johnson

    Eunice Walker Johnson


    Eunice Walker Johnson (April 4, 1916 – January 3, 2010) was the wife of publisher John H. Johnson and an executive at Johnson Publishing Company. Johnson was best known as the founder and director of the Ebony Fashion Fair, which was started in the 1950s as a hospital fundraiser and became an annual fashion tour that highlighted fashion for African-American women that ran until a year before her death.

  23. Jeremiah Haralson

    Jeremiah Haralson


    Jeremiah Haralson (April 1, 1846 – 1916), was among the first ten African-American Congressmen in the United States. Born in slavery in Columbus, Georgia, Haralson eventually rose to serve in the United States House of Representatives from Alabama's 1st congressional district in the 44th United States Congress. He had previously been elected to the state house and state senate. He also received appointments to Republican patronage positions.

  24. Sheyann Webb

    Sheyann Webb


    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Smallest Freedom Fighter" and co-author of the book, Selma, Lord, Selma. As a nine-year-old, Sheyann Webb-Christburg took part in the first attempted Selma to Montgomery march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 7, 1965, known as Bloody Sunday.

  25. Mary Morgan Keipp

    Mary Morgan Keipp


    Mary Morgan Keipp (October 25, 1875, Selma, Alabama – 1961, Selma, Alabama) was a noted figure in the art photography movement of the early 20th century, exhibiting her photographs of rural Dallas County African-Americans in major exhibitions at the New York Camera Club (December 1899), the Annual Photographic Salon (November 1900), Dudley Galleries in London (October 1901), and the National Arts Club of New York Photo-Secession Exhibition (1902) organized by Alfred Stieglitz.

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