Burials in New York City

The list "Burials in New York City" has been viewed 2 times.
This list has 7 sub-lists and 29 members.

  1. Burials in Brooklyn, New York

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  2. Burials in Queens, New York

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  3. Burials in Staten Island

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  4. Burials at New York City Marble Cemetery 0 views

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  5. Burials at St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York 1 view

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  7. Burials at Woodlawn Cemetery (Bronx) 29 views

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  1. Gloria Swanson

    Gloria Swanson


    Gloria May Josephine Swanson (/ˈswɑːnsən/; March 27, 1899 – April 4, 1983) was an American actress, singer, and producer perhaps best known for her role as Norma Desmond, a reclusive silent film star, in the critically acclaimed 1950 film, Sunset Boulevard. She was one of the most prominent stars during the silent film era as both an actress and a fashion icon, especially under the direction of Cecil B. DeMille. She starred in dozens of silent films and was nominated for the first Academy Award in the Best Actress category. She also produced her own films, including Sadie Thompson and The Love of Sunya. In 1929, Swanson transitioned to talkies with The Trespasser. Personal problems and changing tastes saw her popularity wane during the 1930s when she moved into theater and television.

  2. Lillian Gish

    Lillian Gish


    Lillian Diana Gish (October 14, 1893 – February 27, 1993) was an American stage, screen and television actress, director and writer whose film acting career spanned 75 years, from 1912 to 1987. Gish was called The First Lady of American Cinema.

  3. George Tobias

    George Tobias


    George Tobias (July 14, 1901 – February 27, 1980) was an American actor.

  4. Ed Koch

    Ed Koch


    Edward Irving "Ed" Koch (/ˈkɒ/ KOTCH; December 12, 1924 – February 1, 2013) was an American lawyer, politician, political commentator, movie critic and reality television arbitrator. He served in the United States House of Representatives from 1969 to 1977 and three terms as mayor of New York City, which he led from fiscal insolvency to economic boom, from 1978 to 1989.

  5. Albert Anastasia

    Albert Anastasia


    Albert Anastasia (born Umberto Anastasio, September 26, 1902 – October 25, 1957) was one of the most ruthless and feared Cosa Nostra mobsters in United States history. A founder of the American Mafia, Anastasia ran Murder, Inc. during the prewar era and was boss of the modern Gambino crime family during most of the 1950s.

  6. Julia Grant

    Julia Grant


    Julia Boggs Dent Grant (January 26, 1826 – December 14, 1902), was the wife of the 18th President of the United States, Ulysses S. Grant, and was First Lady of the United States from 1869 to 1877.

  7. Francesca S. Cabrini

    Francesca S. Cabrini


    Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini, M.S.C. (Italian: Francesca Saveria Cabrini; July 15, 1850 – December 22, 1917), also called Mother Cabrini, was an Italian religious sister, who founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart, a Catholic religious institute that was a major support to the Italian immigrants to the United States. She was the first naturalized citizen of the United States to be canonized by the Roman Catholic Church, on July 7, 1946.

  8. Henry Ward Beecher

    Henry Ward Beecher


    Henry Ward Beecher (June 24, 1813 – March 8, 1887) was an American Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, and speaker, known for his support of the abolition of slavery, his emphasis on God's love, and his 1875 adultery trial.

  9. Uriah P. Levy

    Uriah P. Levy


    Uriah Phillips Levy (April 22, 1792 – March 26, 1862) was a naval officer, real estate investor, and philanthropist. He was a veteran of the War of 1812 and the first Jewish Commodore of the United States Navy. He was instrumental in helping to end the Navy's practice of flogging, and during his half-century-long service prevailed against the antisemitism he faced among some of his fellow naval officers.

  10. John Valentine

    John Valentine


    John Gill Valentine (November 21, 1855 – October 10, 1903) was an American pitcher and umpire in Major League Baseball who played one season as a player for the 1883 Columbus Buckeyes of the American Association, and later umpired from 1884 to 1888.

  11. Christopher Nugent

    Christopher Nugent


    Christopher Nugent (1840 – May 6, 1898) was an orderly sergeant serving in the United States Marine Corps who received the United States military's highest decoration for bravery, the Medal of Honor, for his actions during the American Civil War.

  12. Shep Fields

    Shep Fields


    Shep Fields (September 12, 1910 – February 23, 1981) was the band leader for the "Shep Fields and His Rippling Rhythm" orchestra during the Big Band era of the 1930s.

  13. Clement Clarke Moore

    Clement Clarke Moore


    Clement Clarke Moore (July 15, 1779 – July 10, 1863) was an American Professor of Oriental and Greek Literature, as well as Divinity and Biblical Learning, at the General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in New York City. Located on land donated by the "Bard of Chelsea" himself, the seminary still stands today on Ninth Avenue between 20th and 21st Streets, in an area known as Chelsea Square. Moore's connection with that institution continued for over twenty-five years. He is allegedly the author of the yuletide poem "A Visit from St. Nicholas", which later became famous as "'Twas the Night Before Christmas", but debate continues as to who really wrote it.

  14. John Sloss Hobart

    John Sloss Hobart


    John Sloss Hobart (May 6, 1738 – February 4, 1805) was an American jurist and politician. He was a member of the Federalist Party who served as United States Senator from New York, and later as a United States federal judge.

  15. Hugh Williamson

    Hugh Williamson


    Hugh Williamson (December 5, 1735–May 22, 1819) was an American politician. He is best known as a signatory to the U.S. Constitution, and for representing North Carolina at the Constitutional Convention.

  16. Alice Claypoole Gwynne

    Alice Claypoole Gwynne


    Alice Claypoole Gwynne Vanderbilt (November 26, 1845 — April 22, 1934) was the wife of Cornelius Vanderbilt II and reigned as the dowager Mrs. Vanderbilt for over 60 years.

  17. Tom York

    Tom York


    Thomas Jefferson "Tom" York (July 13, 1850 – February 17, 1936) was a professional baseball left fielder. Over the course of York's 15-season career as a professional, which spanned the National Association and Major League Baseball, he racked up 1095 hits in 4002 at bats, for a .274 batting average. Twice, during his playing time with the Providence Grays, he was also manager including the entire first season of the team's existence in 1878.

  18. Charles Adams

    Charles Adams


    Charles Adams (May 29, 1770 – November 30, 1800) was the second son of President John Adams and his wife, Abigail (Smith) Adams. He died of alcoholism on November 30, 1800.

  19. Benjamin Moore

    Benjamin Moore


    Benjamin Moore (October 5, 1748 – February 27, 1816) was the second Episcopal bishop of New York.

  20. William Holbrook Beard

    William Holbrook Beard


    William Holbrook Beard (April 13, 1825 – February 20, 1900) was an American painter.

  21. Typhoid Mary

    Typhoid Mary


    Mary Mallon (September 23, 1869 – November 11, 1938), better known as Typhoid Mary, was the first person in the United States identified as an asymptomatic carrier of the pathogen associated with typhoid fever. She was presumed to have infected 51 people, three of whom died, over the course of her career as a cook. She was twice forcibly isolated by public health authorities and died after a total of nearly three decades in isolation.

  22. James Lawrence

    James Lawrence


    James Lawrence (October 1, 1781 – June 4, 1813) was an American naval officer. During the War of 1812, he commanded the USS Chesapeake in a single-ship action against HMS Shannon (commanded by Philip Broke). He is probably best known today for his last words or "dying command" "Don't give up the ship!", which is still a popular naval battle cry, and which was invoked by Oliver Hazard Perry's personal battle flag, adopted to commemorate his dead friend.

  23. Richard Montgomery

    Richard Montgomery


    Richard Montgomery (born October 24, 1946 in Sevierville) is a Tennessee politician and was a member of the Tennessee House of Representatives for the 12th district from 2008-2012, which comprises part of Sevier County. He served as a state representative on the House Education Committee, the House Commerce Committee, the House Rules Committee, the House Utilities and Banking Subcommittee, the House K-12 Subcommittee, and the Joint Select Committee on Children and Youth. Before being elected to the Tennessee House of Representatives, he served on the Sevier County Board of Education for 16 years.

  24. Richard Harison

    Richard Harison


    Richard Harison (January 12, 1747 (O.S.) in New York City – December 7, 1829 in NYC) was an American lawyer and Federalist politician from New York.

  25. James A. Bradley

    James A. Bradley


    James Adam Bradley (February 14, 1830 – June 6, 1921) was a wealthy Manhattan brush manufacturer, financier, member of the New Jersey Senate, philanthropist, and real estate developer. He designed the resort destination of Asbury Park on the New Jersey Shore. Bradley was also involved in the development of Bradley Beach, which bears his name.

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