American country banjoists

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  1. Taylor Swift

    Taylor Swift


    Taylor Alison Swift (born December 13, 1989) is an American singer-songwriter and actress. Raised in Wyomissing, Pennsylvania, she moved to Nashville, Tennessee, at the age of 14 to pursue a career in country music. She signed with the independent label Big Machine Records and became the youngest songwriter ever hired by the Sony/ATV Music publishing house. The release of Swift's self-titled debut album in 2006 established her as a country music star. Her third single, "Our Song," made her the youngest person to single-handedly write and perform a number-one song on the Hot Country Songs chart. She received a Best New Artist nomination at the 2008 Grammy Awards.

  2. Eric Church

    Eric Church


    Kenneth Eric Church (born May 3, 1977), known professionally as Eric Church, is an American country music singer and songwriter. Signed to Capitol Records since 2005, he has since released a total of four studio albums for that label. His debut album, 2006's Sinners Like Me, produced four singles on the Billboard country charts including the Top 20 hits "How 'Bout You", "Two Pink Lines", and "Guys Like Me".

  3. Grandpa Jones

    Grandpa Jones


    Louis Marshall Jones (October 20, 1913 – February 19, 1998), known professionally as Grandpa Jones, was an American banjo player and "old time" country and gospel music singer. He is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame.

  4. Bernie Leadon

    Bernie Leadon


    Bernard Mathew "Bernie" Leadon, III (born July 19, 1947, in Minneapolis, Minnesota), is an American musician and songwriter, best known as a founding member of the Eagles. Prior to the Eagles, he was a member of three pioneering and highly influential country rock bands, Hearts & Flowers, Dillard & Clark and the Flying Burrito Brothers. He is a multi-instrumentalist (guitar, banjo, mandolin, steel guitar, dobro) coming from a bluegrass background. He introduced elements of this music to a mainstream audience during his tenure with the Eagles.

  5. Earl Scruggs

    Earl Scruggs


    Earl Eugene Scruggs (January 6, 1924 – March 28, 2012) was an American musician noted for perfecting and popularizing a three-finger banjo-picking style (now called "Scruggs style") that is a defining characteristic of bluegrass music.

  6. David "Stringbean" Akeman

    David "Stringbean" Akeman


    David Akeman (June 17, 1916 – November 10, 1973), better known as Stringbean (or String Bean), was an American country music banjo player and comedy musician best known for his role on the hit television show, Hee Haw, and as a member of the Grand Ole Opry. Akeman and his wife were murdered by burglars at their rural Tennessee home in 1973.

  7. Abra Moore

    Abra Moore


    Abra Moore (born June 8, 1969 in San Diego, California) is a folk-styled rock singer-songwriter. Her 1997 album Strangest Places included the hit "Four Leaf Clover", which received airplay in Midwest U.S. radio markets and VH1 and MTV2 rotation, and charted on the Billboard Hot 100.

  8. Don Reno

    Don Reno


    Don Wesley Reno (February 21, 1927 – October 16, 1984) was an American bluegrass and country musician best known as a banjo player in partnership with Red Smiley, and later with guitarist Bill Harrell.

  9. Bela Fleck

    Bela Fleck


    Béla Anton Leoš Fleck (born July 10, 1958) is an American banjo player. Widely acknowledged as one of the world's most innovative and technically proficient banjo players, he is best known for his work with the bands New Grass Revival and Béla Fleck and the Flecktones.

  10. Uncle Dave Macon

    Uncle Dave Macon


    Uncle Dave Macon (October 7, 1870 – March 22, 1952), born David Harrison Macon—also known as "The Dixie Dewdrop"—was an American old-time banjo player, singer, songwriter, and comedian. Known for his chin whiskers, plug hat, gold teeth, and gates-ajar collar, he gained regional fame as a vaudeville performer in the early 1920s before becoming the first star of the Grand Ole Opry in the latter half of the decade.

  11. Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith

    Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith


    Arthur Smith (April 1, 1921 – April 3, 2014) was an American musician, songwriter, and producer of records, as well as a radio and TV host for decades. Smith produced radio and TV shows; The Arthur Smith Show was the first nationally syndicated country music show on television. After moving to Charlotte, North Carolina, Smith developed and ran the first commercial recording studio in the Southeast.

  12. Jimmie Driftwood

    Jimmie Driftwood


    James Corbitt Morris (June 20, 1907 – July 12, 1998), known professionally as Jimmy Driftwood or Jimmie Driftwood, was a prolific American folk music songwriter and musician, most famous for his songs "The Battle of New Orleans" and "Tennessee Stud." Driftwood wrote more than 6,000 folk songs, of which more than 300 were recorded by various musicians.

  13. Bryan Sutton

    Bryan Sutton


    Bryan Sutton is an American musician. Primarily known as a flatpicked acoustic guitar player, Sutton also plays many other instruments including mandolin, banjo, and electric guitar.

  14. Abigail Washburn

    Abigail Washburn


    Abigail Washburn (born November 10, 1977) is an American clawhammer banjo player and singer. She performs and records as a soloist, as well as with the old-time bands Uncle Earl and Sparrow Quartet, experimental group The Wu Force, and as a duo with her husband Béla Fleck.

  15. Moonshine Kate

    Moonshine Kate


    Moonshine Kate (b. Rosa Lee Carson, Oct. 10, 1909 – d. 1992, Bainbridge, Georgia) was an American country banjoist, guitarist and singer. She was one of the earliest women to record country music, first appearing on record in the 1920s with her father Fiddlin' John Carson.

  16. Carl Jackson

    Carl Jackson


    Carl Eugene Jackson (born September 18, 1953 in Louisville, Mississippi) is an American country and bluegrass musician. Jackson's first Grammy was awarded in 1992 for his duet album with John Starling titled "Spring Training." In 2003 Jackson produced the Grammy Award-winning CD titled Livin', Lovin', Losin': Songs of the Louvin Brothers - a tribute to Ira and Charlie Louvin. He also recorded one of the songs on the CD, a collection of duets featuring such artists as James Taylor, Alison Krauss, Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash, Emmylou Harris, and others.

  17. Frank Rogers

    Frank Rogers


    Frank Mandeville Rogers V (born in Florence, South Carolina) is an American record producer, songwriter and session musician. In 1990, Rogers made the trek to Nashville, attending Belmont University and graduating with a Music Business degree. While at Belmont, he met friend and future collaborator Brad Paisley. After graduation, Rogers went to work for EMI Nashville Productions and opened up Sea Gayle Music Publishing with Paisley and Chris DuBois. The successful publishing company, where all three writers write, has had over 300 cuts and 28 number one songs. The three business partners, in late 2009, also teamed up with Sony Nashville to form Sea Gayle Records, with a roster that includes Jerrod Niemann.

  18. Nathan Chapman (record producer)

    Nathan Chapman (record producer)


    Nathan Chapman is an American record producer who works in the field of country music. He is known primarily for working with Taylor Swift, having produced her albums Taylor Swift, Fearless, Speak Now and Red. The former was also the first album that he produced. He is a 2001 graduate of Lee University.

  19. Tom Paley

    Tom Paley


    Thomas T. "Tom" Paley (born March 19, 1928) is an American guitarist, banjo and fiddle player. He is best known for his work with the New Lost City Ramblers in the 1950s and 1960s.

  20. Roscoe Holcomb

    Roscoe Holcomb


    Roscoe Holcomb, (born as Roscoe Halcomb September 5, 1912 – died February 1, 1981) was an American singer, banjo player, and guitarist from Daisy, Kentucky. A prominent figure in Appalachian folk music, Holcomb was the inspiration for the term "high, lonesome sound," coined by folklorist and friend John Cohen. Roscoe is known as the "King of the High lonesome sound." The term is now used to describe bluegrass singing, although Holcomb was not, strictly speaking, a bluegrass performer.

  21. Charlie Worsham

    Charlie Worsham


    Charlie Worsham (born September 1, 1985) is an American country music singer and songwriter. He is signed to Warner Bros. Records.

  22. Bill Keith (musician)

    Bill Keith (musician)


    Bill Keith (born December 20, 1939) is a five-string banjoist who made a significant contribution to the stylistic development of the instrument. In the 1960s he introduced a variation on the popular "Scruggs style" of banjo playing (an integral element of bluegrass music) which would soon become known as melodic style, or "Keith style."

  23. Jessie Baker

    Jessie Baker


    Jessie Baker (born February 7, 1991) is an American musician known for playing bluegrass banjo. He describes his playing as "Scruggs-style and Don Reno." He currently resides in Georgetown, Kentucky. Jesse started banjo lessons in 2002, and went on to lead his family's band, "The Baker Boys."

  24. Chris Sharp

    Chris Sharp


    Chris Sharp (born 1973 in Asheville, North Carolina, United States) is an American singer and musician, who participated in the Grammy Award-winning soundtrack of O Brother, Where Art Thou.

  25. Pete Wernick

    Pete Wernick


    Pete Wernick, (born February 25, 1946) also known by many as "Dr. Banjo", is an American musician.

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