Major League Baseball All-Star Game MVP Award

The list "Major League Baseball All-Star Game MVP Award" has been viewed 1 time.
This list has 51 members.

« Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
  1. Derek Jeter

    Derek Jeter


    Derek Sanderson Jeter (/ˈtər/ JEE-tər) (born June 26, 1974) is an American former professional baseball shortstop who played 20 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees. A five-time World Series champion, Jeter is regarded as a central figure of the Yankees' success of the late 1990s and early 2000s for his hitting, baserunning, fielding, and leadership. He is the Yankees' all-time career leader in hits (3,465), doubles (544), games played (2,747), stolen bases (358), times on base (4,716), plate appearances (12,602) and at bats (11,195). His accolades include 14 All-Star selections, five Gold Glove Awards, five Silver Slugger Awards, two Hank Aaron Awards, and a Roberto Clemente Award. Jeter became the 28th player to reach 3,000 hits and finished his career sixth all-time in career hits and the all-time MLB leader in hits by a shortstop.

  2. Bo Jackson

    Bo Jackson


    Vincent Edward "Bo" Jackson (born November 30, 1962) is a retired American baseball and football player. He is the only athlete to be named an All-Star in two major American sports. He was named the greatest athlete of all time by ESPN.

  3. Roger Clemens

    Roger Clemens


    William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962), nicknamed "Rocket", is a retired American baseball pitcher who played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for four teams. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 earned run average (ERA), and 4,672 strikeouts, the third-most all time. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, the most of any pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style, which he used to intimidate batters.

  4. Ken Griffey Jr.

    Ken Griffey Jr.


    George Kenneth "Ken" Griffey, Jr. (born November 21, 1969), nicknamed "Junior" and "The Kid", is an American former professional baseball outfielder who played 22 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) for three teams (1989–2010). He spent most of his career with the Seattle Mariners and Cincinnati Reds, along with a short stint with the Chicago White Sox. A 13-time All-Star, Griffey was one of the most prolific home run hitters in baseball history; his 630 home runs rank as the sixth-most in MLB history. Griffey was also an exceptional defender and won 10 Gold Glove Awards in center field. He is tied for the record of most consecutive games with a home run (8 games, tied with Don Mattingly and Dale Long).

  5. Willie Mays

    Willie Mays


    Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed "The Say Hey Kid" is a retired American Major League Baseball (MLB) center fielder who spent almost all of his 22 season career playing for the New York and San Francisco Giants before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979, his first year of eligibility.

  6. Steve Garvey

    Steve Garvey


    Steven Patrick Garvey (born December 22, 1948), nicknamed "Mr. Clean" because of the squeaky clean image he held throughout his career in baseball, is an American former Major League Baseball first baseman and current Southern California businessman. Garvey was the 1974 NL MVP, ten-time All-Star, and holds the National League record for consecutive games played (1,207).

  7. Mike Trout

    Mike Trout


    Michael Nelson "Mike" Trout (born August 7, 1991) nicknamed The Millville Meteor, is an American professional baseball center fielder for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim of Major League Baseball (MLB). Trout was the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 2014, is a four-time All-Star, and a two-time All-Star Game MVP since becoming a regular player in 2012.

  8. Melky Cabrera

    Melky Cabrera


    Melky Astacio Cabrera (born August 11, 1984) is a Dominican professional baseball outfielder for the Chicago White Sox of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has also played for the New York Yankees, Atlanta Braves, Kansas City Royals, San Francisco Giants and Toronto Blue Jays.

  9. Carl Crawford

    Carl Crawford


    Carl Demonte Crawford (born August 5, 1981), nicknamed "The Perfect Storm", is an American professional baseball left fielder with the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He bats and throws left-handed.

  10. Kirby Puckett

    Kirby Puckett


    Anthony Kirby Puckett (March 14, 1960 – March 6, 2006) was an American professional baseball player. He played his entire 12-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career playing as a center fielder for the Minnesota Twins (1984–1995). Puckett is the Twins' all-time leader in career hits, runs, doubles, and total bases. At the time of his retirement, his .318 career batting average was the highest by any right-handed American League batter since Joe DiMaggio.

  11. Mariano Rivera

    Mariano Rivera


    Mariano Rivera (born November 29, 1969) is a Panamanian former professional baseball pitcher who played 19 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, from 1995 to 2013. Nicknamed "Mo" and "Sandman", Rivera spent most of his career as a relief pitcher and served as the Yankees' closer for 17 seasons. A thirteen-time All-Star and five-time World Series champion, he is MLB's career leader in saves (652) and games finished (952). Rivera won five American League (AL) Rolaids Relief Man Awards and three Delivery Man of the Year Awards, and he finished in the top three in voting for the AL Cy Young Award four times.

  12. Pedro Martinez

    Pedro Martinez


    Pedro Jaime Martínez (born October 25, 1971) is a Dominican-American former starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for five teams from 1992 to 2009, most notably the Boston Red Sox. From 2002 to 2006 he held the major league record for the highest career winning percentage by a pitcher with at least 200 decisions; with a final record of 219 wins and 100 losses, he retired with the fourth highest percentage in history, and the highest by a right-hander since the modern pitching era began in 1893. He ended his career with an earned run average (ERA) of 2.93, the sixth lowest by a pitcher with at least 2,500 innings pitched since 1920. Martínez reached the 3,000 strikeout mark in fewer innings than any pitcher except Randy Johnson, and is the only pitcher to compile over 3,000 strikeouts with less than 3,000 innings pitched; his career strikeout rate of 10.04 per 9 innings trails only Johnson (10.61) among pitchers with over 1,500 innings.

  13. Tim Raines

    Tim Raines


    Timothy Raines (born September 16, 1959), nicknamed "Rock", is an American professional baseball coach and former player. He played as a left fielder in Major League Baseball for six teams from 1979 to 2002 and was best known for his 13 seasons with the Montreal Expos. He is regarded as one of the best leadoff hitters and baserunners in baseball history. In 2013, Raines began working in the Toronto Blue Jays organization as a roving outfield and baserunning instructor.

  14. Carl Yastrzemski

    Carl Yastrzemski


    Carl Michael Yastrzemski (jəˈstrɛmski; nicknamed "Yaz"; born August 22, 1939) is an American former Major League Baseball player. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989. Yastrzemski played his entire 23-year baseball career with the Boston Red Sox (1961–1983). He was primarily a left fielder, but also played as a first baseman and designated hitter later in his career. Yastrzemski is an 18-time All-Star, the possessor of seven Gold Gloves, a member of the 3000 hit club, and the first American League player in that club to also accumulate over 400 home runs. He is second on the all-time list for games played, and third for total at-bats. He is the Red Sox' all-time leader in career RBIs, runs, hits, singles, doubles, total bases, and games played, and is third on the team's list for home runs behind another Red Sox great, Ted Williams, his predecessor in left field, and current Red Sox Designated Hitter David Ortiz. In 1967, Yastrzemski achieved a peak in his career, leading the Red Sox to the American League pennant for the first time in over two decades, in that season being voted the American League MVP, and was the last winner of the Triple Crown for batters in the Major Leagues until Miguel Cabrera achieved the feat in 2012.

  15. Maury Wills

    Maury Wills


    Maurice Morning "Maury" Wills (born October 2, 1932) is a former American Major League Baseball (MLB) shortstop and switch-hitter. He played for the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1959 to 1966 and in 1969–72, Pittsburgh Pirates from 1967 to 1968, and Montreal Expos in 1969. Wills was an essential component of the Dodgers' championship teams in the mid-1960s, and is credited for reviving the stolen base as part of baseball strategy.

  16. Cal Ripken

    Cal Ripken


    Calvin Edwin "Cal" Ripken, Jr. (born August 24, 1960), nicknamed "The Iron Man", is an American former baseball shortstop and third baseman who played 21 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles (1981–2001). One of his position's most offensively productive players, Ripken compiled 3,184 hits, 431 home runs, and 1,695 runs batted in during his career, and he won two Gold Glove Awards for his defense. He was a 19-time All-Star and was twice named American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP). Ripken is best remembered for breaking Lou Gehrig's record for consecutive games played, a record that had stood for 56 years and many deemed unbreakable. In 2007, he was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.

  17. Joe Morgan

    Joe Morgan


    Joe Leonard Morgan (born September 19, 1943) is a former Major League Baseball second baseman who played for the Houston Astros, Cincinnati Reds, San Francisco Giants, Philadelphia Phillies, and Oakland Athletics from 1963 to 1984. He won two World Series championships with the Reds in 1975 and 1976 and was also named the National League Most Valuable Player in those years. Considered one of the greatest second basemen of all-time, Morgan was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990. He became a baseball broadcaster for ESPN after his retirement, and now hosts a weekly nationally syndicated radio show for Sports USA. He is currently a special adviser to the Reds.

  18. Ichirô Suzuki

    Ichirô Suzuki


    Ichiro Suzuki (鈴木 一朗 Suzuki Ichirō), often referred to mononymously as Ichiro (イチロー Ichirō) (born October 22, 1973), is a Japanese professional baseball right fielder for the Miami Marlins of Major League Baseball (MLB). Originally a player in Japan's Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB), Ichiro moved to the United States in 2001 to play in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Seattle Mariners, with whom he spent 11 seasons, and later the New York Yankees. Ichiro has established a number of batting records, including MLB's single-season record for hits with 262. He had 10 consecutive 200-hit seasons, the longest streak by any player in history. Between his career hits in Japan's and America's major leagues, Ichiro stands at second place all-time in top-flight hits, trailing only Pete Rose.

  19. J.D. Drew

    J.D. Drew


    David Jonathan "J. D." Drew (born November 20, 1975) is a former American Major League Baseball right fielder. He is a left-handed hitter, and began his major league career in 1998 with the St. Louis Cardinals. He is the brother of two other major league players, Stephen and Tim.

  20. Roberto Alomar

    Roberto Alomar


    Roberto "Robbie" Alomar Velázquez (/ˈæləmɑr/; born February 5, 1968) is a former Major League Baseball player (1988–2004), regarded highly as a second baseman. During his career, the 12-time All-Star won more Gold Gloves (10) than any other second baseman in baseball history, and also won the third-most Silver Slugger Awards (4) for a second baseman. On January 5, 2011, Alomar was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, in his second year of eligibility. He became the first Hall of Fame member to be inducted as a Toronto Blue Jays player. Currently, Alomar serves as a Special Advisor to the Blue Jays.

  21. Fred McGriff

    Fred McGriff


    Frederick Stanley McGriff (born October 31, 1963 in Tampa, Florida) is a former Major League Baseball player who played for six teams from 1986 through 2004. A power-hitting first baseman, he became a five-time All-Star and led both leagues in home runs in separate years - the American League in 1989 and the National League in 1992. McGriff finished his career with 493 home runs, tied with Hall of Fame player Lou Gehrig, and only seven homers away from joining the 500 home run club. He won a World Series title as a first baseman with the Atlanta Braves in 1995. He currently works in the Tampa Bay Rays' front office as an advisor and also for Bright House Sports Network as a co-host for "The Baysball Show".

  22. Dave Concepción

    Dave Concepción


    David Ismael "Dave" Concepción Benitez (born June 17, 1948), is a former shortstop in Major League Baseball. In 2007 the Cincinnati Reds retired jersey number 13 in honor of Concepción's contributions to the team.

  23. Bobby Bonds

    Bobby Bonds


    Bobby Lee Bonds (March 15, 1946 – August 23, 2003) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball from 1968 to 1981, primarily with the San Francisco Giants. Noted for his outstanding combination of power hitting and speed, he was the first player to have more than two seasons of 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases, doing so a record five times (the record was matched only by his son Barry), and was the first to accomplish the feat in both major leagues; he became the second player to hit 300 career home runs and steal 300 bases, joining Willie Mays. Together with Barry, he is part of baseball's most accomplished father-son combination, holding the record for combined home runs, RBIs, and stolen bases. A prolific leadoff hitter, he also set major league records for most times leading off a game with a home run in a career (35) and a season (11, in 1973); both records have since been broken.

  24. Alfonso Soriano

    Alfonso Soriano


    Alfonso Guilleard Soriano (born January 7, 1976) is a Dominican former professional baseball left fielder and second baseman. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, Chicago Cubs, Texas Rangers, and Washington Nationals, and in Nippon Professional Baseball for the Hiroshima Toyo Carp.

  25. Prince Fielder

    Prince Fielder


    Prince Semien Fielder (born May 9, 1984) is an American professional baseball first baseman and designated hitter for the Texas Rangers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has also played for the Milwaukee Brewers and Detroit Tigers.

« Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | Next »

This website is part of the FamousFix entertainment community. By continuing past this page, and by your continued use of this site, you agree to be bound by and abide by the Terms of Use. Loaded in 0.17 secs.
Terms of Use  |  Copyright  |  Privacy
Copyright 2006-2015, FamousFix