Songs of the Vietnam War

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  1. Okie From Muskogee

    Okie From Muskogee (1972)

    2,051 views

    "Okie from Muskogee" is an American country music song performed by its co-writer, Merle Haggard. Released in September 1969, the song became one of the most famous of his career.


  2. 8th of November

    8th of November (2008)

    1,600 views

    "8th of November" is a song written and recorded by American country music duo Big & Rich. It was released in May 2006 as the third and final single from their album Comin' to Your City. The song became the duo's seventh Top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, where it peaked at No. 18, in addition to reaching No. 94 on the Billboard Hot 100.


  3. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?

    Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? (1969)

    1,350 views

    "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" is a song written and sung by Robert Lamm while in the rock band The Chicago Transit Authority (later shortened to "Chicago") and recorded for their eponymous debut album The Chicago Transit Authority in 1969.


  4. Travelin' Soldier

    Travelin' Soldier (2002)

    1,271 views

    "Travelin' Soldier" is a song written and originally recorded by American country music artist Bruce Robison in 1996 and again, in rewritten form, in 1999. It was later recorded by Ty England on his 1999 album, Highways & Dance Halls. The first rendition to be issued as a single was by the Dixie Chicks in December 2002, from their album Home. It became the group's sixth and final single to reach No. 1 on Billboard "Hot Country Singles & Tracks" (now "Hot Country Songs"). A version of the song featuring Natalie Maines of the Dixie Chicks, Bruce Robison and Robison's wife, Kelly Willis, appears on KGSR's Broadcasts Vol. 13 album.


  5. Crazy On You

    Crazy On You (1976)

    1,162 views

    "Crazy on You" is the debut American single from the rock band Heart. It was the first single following the release of their debut album Dreamboat Annie, released in 1976 (two earlier Canadian singles had preceded the release of the album). Starting with an acoustic guitar intro called "Silver Wheels", the song turns into fast-paced rock song that was the signature sound of the band in their early years. "Crazy on You" attracted attention both for the relatively unusual combination of an acoustic guitar paired with an electric guitar, and the fact that the acoustic guitarist was a female – a rarity in rock music during that time. According to co-writer/guitarist Nancy Wilson on an episode of In the Studio with Redbeard (which devoted an entire episode to the Dreamboat Annie album), the rapid acoustic rhythm part was inspired by The Moody Blues song "Question".


  6. Goodnight Saigon

    Goodnight Saigon (1982)

    1,121 views

    "Goodnight Saigon" is a song written by Billy Joel, originally appearing on his 1982 album The Nylon Curtain, about the Vietnam War. It depicts the situation and attitude of United States Marines beginning with their military training on Parris Island and then into different aspects of Vietnam combat.


  7. The Fightin' Side Of Me

    The Fightin' Side Of Me (1972)

    938 views

    "The Fightin' Side of Me" is an American country music song performed by its writer, Merle Haggard. Released in 1970 as the follow-up to "Okie from Muskogee", the song became one of the most famous of his career.


  8. What's Going On

    What's Going On (1970)

    888 views

    "What's Going On" is a song by American recording artist Marvin Gaye, released in 1971 on the Motown subsidiary, Tamla. Originally inspired by a police brutality incident witnessed by Renaldo "Obie" Benson, the song was composed by Benson, Al Cleveland and Gaye and produced by Gaye himself. The song, which focused on major seventh and minor seventh chords, and was oriented in sounds by jazz, gospel and classical music orchestration, was mainly viewed as a meditation on the troubles and problems of the world, proving to be a timely and relatable release, and marked Gaye's departure from the Motown Sound towards more personal material. Later topping the Hot Soul Singles chart for five weeks and crossing over to number-two on the Billboard Hot 100, it would sell over two million copies, becoming Gaye's second most successful Motown song to date.


  9. 2 + 2 = ?

    2 + 2 = ?

    531 views

    "2 + 2 = ?" is a single from The Bob Seger System, released in January 1968, on Capitol Records. Written by Seger, it is an anti-Vietnam War song.


  10. Still In Saigon

    Still In Saigon

    518 views

    "Still in Saigon", is a song written by Dan Daley and performed by the Charlie Daniels Band and released on their 1982 album Windows. It was written by Daley in May 1981.


  11. Khe Sanh

    Khe Sanh

    510 views

    "Khe Sanh" is an Australian song, released as a 45 rpm single in May 1978, and named after the district capital of Hướng Hóa District, Quảng Trị Province, Vietnam. The song, performed by Cold Chisel, having been written by pianist Don Walker and featuring the vocals of Jimmy Barnes, is about an Australian Vietnam veteran dealing with his return to civilian life. According to Toby Creswell's liner notes for the band's 1991 compilation album Chisel, the song is also a story of restless youth.


  12. Fortunate Son

    Fortunate Son (1969)

    464 views

    "Fortunate Son" is a song by Creedence Clearwater Revival released on their album Willy and the Poor Boys in 1969. It was released as a single, together with "Down on the Corner", in September 1969. This song reached #14 on the United States charts on 22 November 1969, the week before Billboard changed its methodology on double-sided hits. The tracks combined to climb to #9 the next week, on the way to peaking at #3 three more weeks later, on 20 December 1969. It won the RIAA Gold Disc award in December 1970. Pitchfork Media placed it at number 17 on its list of "The 200 Greatest Songs of the 1960s". Rolling Stone placed it at #99 on its "500 Greatest Songs of All Time" list. In 2014, the song was added to the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


  13. Sam Stone

    Sam Stone

    427 views

    "Sam Stone" is a song written by John Prine about a drug-addicted veteran with a Purple Heart and his death by overdose. It appeared on Prine's eponymous 1971 debut album. The song was originally titled "Great Society Conflict Veteran's Blues".


  14. Alice's Restaurant

    Alice's Restaurant

    340 views

    "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" is a musical monologue by singer-songwriter Arlo Guthrie released on his 1967 album Alice's Restaurant. The song is one of Guthrie's most prominent works, based on a true incident in his life that began on Thanksgiving Day 1965, and which inspired a 1969 movie of the same name. Apart from the chorus which begins and ends it, the "song" is in fact a spoken monologue, with ragtime guitar backing.


  15. WAR PIGS

    WAR PIGS (1970)

    327 views

    "War Pigs" is a song by English heavy metal band Black Sabbath. It is the opening track from their 1970 album Paranoid.


  16. Rooster

    Rooster (1992)

    275 views

    "Rooster" is a grunge song by the band Alice in Chains. The song was released as a single in 1993 and is featured on the band's second studio album, Dirt (1992). The song was included on the compilation albums Unplugged (1996), Music Bank (1999), Greatest Hits (2001), and The Essential Alice in Chains (2006). A demo version of the song was also included on Music Bank.


  17. Your Flag Decal Won't Get You into Heaven Anymore

    Your Flag Decal Won't Get You into Heaven Anymore

    238 views

    "Your Flag Decal Won't Get You Into Heaven Anymore" is an anti-war song by John Prine. It appeared on his eponymous introductory album, John Prine (1971). It's an attack on phony patriotism, especially in the context of exhibitionistic chauvinism.


  18. Give Peace A Chance

    Give Peace A Chance (1978)

    219 views

    "Give Peace a Chance" is a song written by John Lennon (originally credited Lennon–McCartney), and performed with Yoko Ono in Montreal, Canada. Released as a single in 1969 by the Plastic Ono Band on Apple Records (catalogue Apple 13 in the United Kingdom, Apple 1809 in the United States), it is the first solo single issued by Lennon, released when he was still a member of the Beatles, and became an anthem of the American anti-war movement during the 1970s. It peaked at number 14 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 2 on the British singles chart.


  19. Machine Gun

    Machine Gun (1970)

    216 views

    "Machine Gun" is a song written by American musician Jimi Hendrix, and originally recorded by Band of Gypsys for their self-titled live album (1970). It is a lengthy, loosely defined (jam-based) protest of the Vietnam War, and perhaps a broader comment on conflict of any kind. Although a proper studio recording was never released, there are several other live recordings on album, including Live at Berkeley and Blue Wild Angel: Live at the Isle of Wight.


  20. Born in The U.S.A.

    Born in The U.S.A. (1984)

    208 views

    "Born in the U.S.A." is a 1984 song written and performed by Bruce Springsteen. Taken from the album of the same name, it is one of his best-known singles. Rolling Stone ranked the song 275th on their list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time". In 2001, the RIAA's Songs of the Century placed the song 59th (out of 365). Lyrically, the song deals with the effects of the Vietnam War on Americans, although it is often interpreted as a patriotic or nationalistic anthem.


  21. Hand of Doom

    Hand of Doom (1970)

    197 views

    "Hand of Doom" is a song by the English heavy metal band Black Sabbath, originally appearing as the sixth song on their second album Paranoid, released in 1970. It has been performed in many of Black Sabbath's live concerts. The lyrics were written by Geezer Butler while the music was written by the four members. "Hand of Doom" is accepted as one of the best songs on the album by many fans of Black Sabbath. It is the second longest song on the album behind "War Pigs". The song was conceived after the band had observed a growing number of US soldiers arriving in England in the late 1960s from the Vietnam War with severe drug addictions. It's about them taking drugs to forget the atrocities of war, only to see it catch up to them and slowly destroy them from the inside.


  22. I Should Be Proud

    I Should Be Proud (1970)

    179 views

  23. I'm Your Captain

    I'm Your Captain (1970)

    165 views

    "I'm Your Captain (Closer to Home)" is an epic 1970 song written by American musician Mark Farner and recorded by Grand Funk Railroad as the closing track to their album Closer to Home. Ten minutes in duration, it is the band's longest studio recording. One of the group's best-known songs, it is composed as two distinct but closely related movements. Its title has been rendered in various ways across many different Grand Funk albums, including "I'm Your Captain", "I'm Your Captain/Closer to Home", "Closer to Home/I'm Your Captain", "Closer to Home (I'm Your Captain)", and "Closer to Home".


  24. Zor And Zam

    Zor And Zam (1968)

    140 views

    "Zor and Zam" is a song written by Bill and John Chadwick and recorded by The Monkees for their 1968 album The Birds, The Bees & The Monkees. It was also featured in the final episode of season 2 of the band's popular television series, entitled "The Frodis Caper". The song involves the preparations for a war between two monarchs of rival kingdoms; however, when it comes time to fight, no one shows up and the war never happens.


  25. Orange Crush

    Orange Crush (1988)

    115 views

    "Orange Crush" is a song by the American alternative rock band R.E.M. It was released as the first single from the band's sixth studio album, Green, in 1988. It was not commercially released in the US despite reaching number one as a promotional single on both the Mainstream and Modern Rock Tracks (where, at the time, it had the record for longest stay at number one with eight weeks, beating U2). It peaked at number 28 on the UK Singles Charts, easily making it the band's then-highest chart hit in Britain.


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