Songs of the Vietnam War

The list "Songs of the Vietnam War" has been viewed 49 times.
This list has 48 members. See also Works about the Vietnam War, Songs by war

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  1. 2 + 2 = ?

    2 + 2 = ?

    543 views

    "2 + 2 = ?" is a single from The Bob Seger System, released in January 1968, on Capitol Records. Written by Seger, it is an anti-Vietnam War song.


  2. 21st Century Schizoid Man

    21st Century Schizoid Man (1972)

    39 views

    "21st Century Schizoid Man" is a song by progressive rock band King Crimson from their debut album In the Court of the Crimson King.


  3. 7 O'clock News/silent Night

    7 O'clock News/silent Night (1966)

    79 views

    "7 O'Clock News/Silent Night" is a song by American music duo Simon & Garfunkel from their third studio album, Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme (1966). The track is sound collage juxtaposing a rendition of the Christmas carol "Silent Night" with a simulated "7 O'Clock News" bulletin of the actual events of August 3, 1966.


  4. 8th of November

    8th of November (2008)

    1,609 views

    "8th of November" is a song written and recorded by American country music duo Big & Rich. It was released in May 2006 as the third and final single from their album Comin' to Your City. The song became the duo's seventh Top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, where it peaked at No. 18, in addition to reaching No. 94 on the Billboard Hot 100.


  5. Alice's Restaurant

    Alice's Restaurant

    357 views

    "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" is a musical monologue by singer-songwriter Arlo Guthrie released on his 1967 album Alice's Restaurant. The song is one of Guthrie's most prominent works, based on a true incident in his life that began on Thanksgiving Day 1965, and which inspired a 1969 movie of the same name. Apart from the chorus which begins and ends it, the "song" is in fact a spoken monologue, with ragtime guitar backing.


  6. Ballad of the Green Berets

    Ballad of the Green Berets

    10 views

    "The Ballad of the Green Berets" is a patriotic song in the ballad style about the Green Berets, an elite special force in the U.S. Army. It is one of the very few songs of the 1960s to cast the military in a positive light and in 1966 it became a major hit, reaching No. 1 for five weeks on the Hot 100 and four weeks on Cashbox. It was also a crossover smash, reaching No. 1 on Billboard's Easy Listening chart and No. 2 on Billboard's Country survey.


  7. Billy Don't Be A Hero

    Billy Don't Be A Hero

    28 views

    "Billy Don't Be A Hero" is a 1974 anti-war pop song by Paper Lace and was also recorded by Bo Donaldson and the Heywoods. It was written by Mitch Murray and Peter Callander.


  8. Born in The U.S.A.

    Born in The U.S.A. (1984)

    208 views

    "Born in the U.S.A." is a 1984 song written and performed by Bruce Springsteen. Taken from the album of the same name, it is one of his best-known singles. Rolling Stone ranked the song 275th on their list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time". In 2001, the RIAA's Songs of the Century placed the song 59th (out of 365). Lyrically, the song deals with the effects of the Vietnam War on Americans, although it is often interpreted as a patriotic or nationalistic anthem.


  9. Copperhead Road

    Copperhead Road (1990)

    97 views

    Copperhead Road is an American alternative country/country rock album released in 1988 by Steve Earle. Often referred to as Earle's first "rock record", Earle himself calls it the world's first blend of heavy metal and bluegrass, while in their January 26, 1989 review of the album Rolling Stone suggested the style be known as "power twang".


  10. Crazy On You

    Crazy On You (1976)

    1,172 views

    "Crazy on You" is the debut American single from the rock band Heart. It was the first single following the release of their debut album Dreamboat Annie, released in 1976 (two earlier Canadian singles had preceded the release of the album). Starting with an acoustic guitar intro called "Silver Wheels", the song turns into fast-paced rock song that was the signature sound of the band in their early years. "Crazy on You" attracted attention both for the relatively unusual combination of an acoustic guitar paired with an electric guitar, and the fact that the acoustic guitarist was a female – a rarity in rock music during that time. According to co-writer/guitarist Nancy Wilson on an episode of In the Studio with Redbeard (which devoted an entire episode to the Dreamboat Annie album), the rapid acoustic rhythm part was inspired by The Moody Blues song "Question".


  11. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?

    Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? (1969)

    1,387 views

    "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" is a song written and sung by Robert Lamm while in the rock band The Chicago Transit Authority (later shortened to "Chicago") and recorded for their eponymous debut album The Chicago Transit Authority in 1969.


  12. Draft Dodger Rag

    Draft Dodger Rag

    9 views

    "Draft Dodger Rag" is a satirical anti-war song by Phil Ochs, a U.S. protest singer from the 1960s known for being a harsh critic of the American military industrial complex. Originally released on his 1965 album, I Ain't Marching Anymore, "Draft Dodger Rag" quickly became an anthem of the anti-Vietnam War movement.


  13. Eve Of Destruction

    Eve Of Destruction

    46 views

    "Eve of Destruction" is a protest song written by P. F. Sloan in 1965. Several artists have recorded it, but the best-known recording was by Barry McGuire. This recording was made between July 12 and July 15, 1965 and released by Dunhill Records. The accompanying musicians were top-tier LA session players: P.F. Sloan on guitar, Hal Blaine (of Phil Spector's "Wrecking Crew") on drums, and Larry Knechtel on bass. The vocal track was thrown on as a rough mix and was not intended to be the final version, but a copy of the recording "leaked" out to a DJ, who began playing it. The song was an instant hit and as a result the more polished vocal track that was at first envisioned was never recorded.


  14. For What It's Worth

    For What It's Worth (1969)

    88 views

    "For What It's Worth" is a song written by Stephen Stills. It was performed by Buffalo Springfield, recorded on December 5, 1966, and released as a single in January 1967; it was later added to the re-release of their first album, Buffalo Springfield. The single peaked at number seven on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. This song is currently ranked #63 on Rolling Stone's list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time as well as the eighth best song of 1967 by Acclaimed Music.


  15. Fortunate Son

    Fortunate Son (1969)

    474 views

    "Fortunate Son" is a song by Creedence Clearwater Revival released on their album Willy and the Poor Boys in 1969. It was released as a single, together with "Down on the Corner", in September 1969. This song reached #14 on the United States charts on 22 November 1969, the week before Billboard changed its methodology on double-sided hits. The tracks combined to climb to #9 the next week, on the way to peaking at #3 three more weeks later, on 20 December 1969. It won the RIAA Gold Disc award in December 1970. Pitchfork Media placed it at number 17 on its list of "The 200 Greatest Songs of the 1960s". Rolling Stone placed it at #99 on its "500 Greatest Songs of All Time" list. In 2014, the song was added to the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."


  16. Give Peace A Chance

    Give Peace A Chance (1978)

    221 views

    "Give Peace a Chance" is a song written by John Lennon (originally credited Lennon–McCartney), and performed with Yoko Ono in Montreal, Canada. Released as a single in 1969 by the Plastic Ono Band on Apple Records (catalogue Apple 13 in the United Kingdom, Apple 1809 in the United States), it is the first solo single issued by Lennon, released when he was still a member of the Beatles, and became an anthem of the American anti-war movement during the 1970s. It peaked at number 14 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 2 on the British singles chart.


  17. Goodnight Saigon

    Goodnight Saigon (1982)

    1,128 views

    "Goodnight Saigon" is a song written by Billy Joel, originally appearing on his 1982 album The Nylon Curtain, about the Vietnam War. It depicts the situation and attitude of United States Marines beginning with their military training on Parris Island and then into different aspects of Vietnam combat.


  18. Hand of Doom

    Hand of Doom (1970)

    197 views

    "Hand of Doom" is a song by the English heavy metal band Black Sabbath, originally appearing as the sixth song on their second album Paranoid, released in 1970. It has been performed in many of Black Sabbath's live concerts. The lyrics were written by Geezer Butler while the music was written by the four members. "Hand of Doom" is accepted as one of the best songs on the album by many fans of Black Sabbath. It is the second longest song on the album behind "War Pigs". The song was conceived after the band had observed a growing number of US soldiers arriving in England in the late 1960s from the Vietnam War with severe drug addictions. It's about them taking drugs to forget the atrocities of war, only to see it catch up to them and slowly destroy them from the inside.


  19. Happy Xmas

    Happy Xmas (1998)

    73 views

    "Happy Xmas (War Is Over)" is a song written by John Lennon and Yoko Ono and released in 1971 as a single by John & Yoko/Plastic Ono Band with the Harlem Community Choir.


  20. I'm Your Captain

    I'm Your Captain (1970)

    167 views

    "I'm Your Captain (Closer to Home)" is an epic 1970 song written by American musician Mark Farner and recorded by Grand Funk Railroad as the closing track to their album Closer to Home. Ten minutes in duration, it is the band's longest studio recording. One of the group's best-known songs, it is composed as two distinct but closely related movements. Its title has been rendered in various ways across many different Grand Funk albums, including "I'm Your Captain", "I'm Your Captain/Closer to Home", "Closer to Home/I'm Your Captain", "Closer to Home (I'm Your Captain)", and "Closer to Home".


  21. I Should Be Proud

    I Should Be Proud (1970)

    179 views

  22. I Was Only Nineteen

    I Was Only Nineteen

    23 views

    "Only Nineteen", "I Was Only Nineteen" or "A Walk in the Light Green" is the most widely recognised song by Australian folk group Redgum. The song was released in March 1983 as a single, which hit number one on the Kent Music Report Singles Chart for two weeks. It was also recorded for Redgum's live album Caught in the Act (Epic Records) released in June, which stayed in the top forty of the Kent Music Report Albums Chart for four months. Royalties for the song go to the Vietnam Veterans Association of Australia. It is in the Australasian Performing Right Association's Top 30 Australian Songs of all time.


  23. Khe Sanh

    Khe Sanh

    510 views

    "Khe Sanh" is an Australian song, released as a 45 rpm single in May 1978, and named after the district capital of Hướng Hóa District, Quảng Trị Province, Vietnam. The song, performed by Cold Chisel, having been written by pianist Don Walker and featuring the vocals of Jimmy Barnes, is about an Australian Vietnam veteran dealing with his return to civilian life. According to Toby Creswell's liner notes for the band's 1991 compilation album Chisel, the song is also a story of restless youth.


  24. Machine Gun

    Machine Gun (1970)

    216 views

    "Machine Gun" is a song written by American musician Jimi Hendrix, and originally recorded by Band of Gypsys for their self-titled live album (1970). It is a lengthy, loosely defined (jam-based) protest of the Vietnam War, and perhaps a broader comment on conflict of any kind. Although a proper studio recording was never released, there are several other live recordings on album, including Live at Berkeley and Blue Wild Angel: Live at the Isle of Wight.


  25. Masters of War

    Masters of War (1963)

    27 views

    "Masters of War" is a song by Bob Dylan, written over the winter of 1962–63 and released on the album The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan in the spring of 1963. The song's melody was adapted from the traditional "Nottamun Town". Dylan's lyrics are a protest against the Cold War arms build-up of the early 1960s.


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