Grammy Award for Song of the Year

The list "Grammy Award for Song of the Year" has been viewed 13 times.
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  1. Rolling In The Deep

    Rolling In The Deep

    4,378 views

    "Rolling in the Deep" is a song recorded by British singer-songwriter Adele for her second studio album, 21. The song was written by Adele and Paul Epworth. The singer herself describes it as a "dark blues-y gospel disco tune". The largest crossover hit in the United States from the past 25 years, "Rolling in the Deep" gained radio airplay from many different radio formats. It was first released on 29 November 2010 as the lead single from 21 in digital download format. The lyrics describe the emotions of a scorned lover.


  2. I Write The Songs

    I Write The Songs (1975)

    2,402 views

    "I Write the Songs" is a popular song written by Bruce Johnston in 1975 and made famous by Barry Manilow. Manilow's version reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in January 1976 after spending two weeks atop the Billboard adult contemporary chart in December 1975. A Grammy Award for Song of the Year and nominated for Record of the Year in 1977, it became one of Manilow's signature songs.


  3. Just the Way You Are

    Just the Way You Are (1977)

    2,381 views

    "Just the Way You Are" is a song by Billy Joel from his 1977 album, The Stranger. It was Joel's first US Top 10 (reaching #3) and UK Top 20 single, as well as Joel's first gold single in the US. "Just the Way You Are" won the 1978 Grammy Awards for Record of the Year and Song of the Year.


  4. Rehab

    Rehab (2006)

    1,970 views

    "Rehab" is a song by English singer-songwriter Amy Winehouse. It was released on 23 October 2006 as the first single from her second studio album Back to Black. It was written by Winehouse and produced by Mark Ronson. The lyrics are autobiographical, and talk about Winehouse's refusal to enter a rehabilitation clinic. It peaked at number 7 in the United Kingdom on the UK Singles Chart and number 9 in the United States on the Billboard Hot 100.


  5. Tears In Heaven

    Tears In Heaven (1991)

    1,969 views

    "Tears in Heaven" is a song by Eric Clapton and Will Jennings, from the 1991 Rush film soundtrack. The song was written about the pain and loss Clapton felt following the death of his four-year-old son, Conor. Conor fell from a window of a 53rd-floor New York apartment building owned by his mother's friend on March 20, 1991. Clapton arrived at the apartment shortly after the accident. "Tears in Heaven" is one of Clapton's most successful songs, as it reached number two on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in the U.S. The song also stayed three weeks as No. 1 on the American adult contemporary chart in 1992.


  6. Fallin'

    Fallin' (2001)

    1,633 views

    "Fallin'" is a song recorded, written, and produced by American recording artist Alicia Keys for her debut album, Songs in A Minor. Released to radio and music video outlets in 2001, it is generally considered her signature song. "Fallin'" became Keys' first number-one single in the United States and her first top five hit in several countries. It is also Keys' second biggest single to date after 2007's "No One". In 2009 the single was named the 29th most successful song of the 2000s, on the Billboard Hot 100 Songs of the Decade. Rolling Stone ranked it number sixty-two on their Top 100 Songs of the 2000s decade. The song charted at 413 in Blender magazine's 500 Greatest Songs Since You Were Born. "Fallin'" won three Grammy Awards in 2002, including Song of the Year, Best R&B Song, and Best Female R&B Vocal Performance, and was also nominated for Record of the Year. The single set the record for the song with the largest cumulative audience in the history of pop radio with 93 million, but was broken by pop singer Katy Perry, with the single "E.T." in 2011.


  7. Evergreen

    Evergreen (1994)

    1,612 views

    "Evergreen (Love Theme from A Star Is Born)" is the theme song from the 1976 film A Star Is Born. It was composed and performed by Barbra Streisand with lyrics by Paul Williams, and arranged by Ian Freebairn-Smith. The song was released on the soundtrack album to A Star Is Born.


  8. Every Breath You Take

    Every Breath You Take (1983)

    1,591 views

    "Every Breath You Take" is a song by The Police on the band's 1983 album Synchronicity, written by Sting. The single entered the charts at position 36 on 4 June 1983. The single was the biggest hit of 1983, topping the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart for eight weeks, (the band's only #1 hit on that chart), and also the UK Singles Chart for four weeks. It also topped the Billboard Top Tracks chart for nine weeks.


  9. Don't Know Why

    Don't Know Why (2001)

    1,451 views

    "Don't Know Why" is a song written by Jesse Harris which originally appeared on his 1999 album, Jesse Harris & the Ferdinandos. It was the second single by Norah Jones from her breakthrough 2002 album Come Away with Me. Although Jones's version only peaked at number thirty on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, it was a critical success for her that helped establish her as a respected new artist, and subsequently her album sold extremely well. The single went on to win three Grammy Awards in 2003 for "Record of the Year", "Song of the Year", and "Best Female Pop Vocal Performance". It remains Jones's biggest hit single in the USA to date, and her only one to reach the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100. The single was also a hit internationally and reached Top 10 in several countries. The song charted at 459 in Blender magazine's 500 Greatest Songs Since You Were Born.


  10. Daughters

    Daughters (2003)

    1,430 views

    "Daughters" is the third single from Heavier Things, the 2003 studio album from blues singer-songwriter, John Mayer. The critically acclaimed song won numerous awards, including the 2005 Grammy Award for Song of the Year at the 47th Grammy Awards.


  11. Kiss from a Rose

    Kiss from a Rose (1994)

    1,424 views

    "Kiss from a Rose" is a song from Seal's second eponymous album Seal (aka Seal II). The song was first released as a single in July 1994. Re-released in 1995, it was included on the Batman Forever film soundtrack, helping it top the charts in the U.S. and Australia. It took the 1996 Grammy Awards for both Record of the Year and Song of the Year. Seal also won Best Male Pop Vocal Performance.


  12. The Battle Of New Orleans

    The Battle Of New Orleans (1959)

    1,386 views

    "The Battle of New Orleans" is a song written by Jimmy Driftwood. The song describes the 1815 Battle of New Orleans from the perspective of an American soldier; the song tells the tale of the battle with a light tone and provides a rather comical version of what actually happened at the battle. It has been recorded by many artists, but the singer most often associated with this song is Johnny Horton. His version scored number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1959 (see 1959 in music).


  13. Sailing

    Sailing (1979)

    1,384 views

    "Sailing" is a song written and recorded by American artist Christopher Cross. It was released in June 1980 as the second single from his eponymous debut album. The song was a success in the USA, winning Grammy Awards for Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Arrangement of the Year, and helping Cross win the Best New Artist award. VH1 named this the greatest "softsational soft rock" music song of all time.


  14. Change The World

    Change The World (1996)

    1,131 views

    "Change the World" is a song written by Tommy Sims, Gordon Kennedy, and Wayne Kirkpatrick whose best-known version was recorded by Eric Clapton for the soundtrack of the 1996 film, Phenomenon. The song won Grammy Awards for Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Male Pop Vocal performance. Additionally, the song was chosen by the RIAA as one of the Songs of the Century and ranked at No. 270.


  15. Not Ready to Make Nice

    Not Ready to Make Nice (2006)

    1,130 views

    "Not Ready to Make Nice" is a country pop song co-written and performed by the American all-female band Dixie Chicks for their seventh studio album Taking the Long Way (2006). The song was released as the first physical single from the album in June 2006. It remains the Chicks's biggest hit in the US to date.


  16. Always On My Mind

    Always On My Mind (1973)

    1,028 views

    "Always on My Mind" is an American country music song by Johnny Christopher, Mark James and Wayne Carson, originally recorded by Brenda Lee in 1972.


  17. Need You Now

    Need You Now (2010)

    984 views

    "Need You Now" is a country pop song performed by American country music group Lady Antebellum. The song was co-written by Lady Antebellum and Josh Kear, and produced by the trio along with Paul Worley. It serves as the lead-off single and title track to their second studio album, Need You Now, which was released on January 26, 2010. The song was their debut single in the UK and Europe and was released on April 26, 2010. It won four Grammy Awards in 2011, including for Song of the Year and Record of the Year, the first country song to win both honors since 2007, and only the second ever.


  18. My Heart Will Go On

    My Heart Will Go On (1997)

    903 views

    "My Heart Will Go On" is the theme song to the 1997 blockbuster film Titanic. With music by James Horner, lyrics by Will Jennings, and production by Simon Franglen, James Horner and Walter Afanasieff, it was recorded by Céline Dion. Originally released in 1997 on the Titanic soundtrack album and then on Dion's album Let's Talk About Love, the song went to number 1 all over the world, including the United States, United Kingdom and Australia. "My Heart Will Go On" was released in Australia and Germany on December 8, 1997, and in the rest of the world in January and February 1998. It became Dion's biggest hit, and one of the best-selling singles of all time, and was the world's best-selling single of 1998.


  19. Bette Davis Eyes

    Bette Davis Eyes (1981)

    819 views

    "Bette Davis Eyes" is a song written by Donna Weiss and Jackie DeShannon, and made popular by American singer-songwriter Kim Carnes. It spent nine weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was Billboard's biggest hit of the entire year for 1981. The recording won the 1982 Grammy Awards for both Record of the Year and Song of the Year.


  20. Killing Me Softly With His Song

    Killing Me Softly With His Song (1973)

    631 views

    "Killing Me Softly with His Song" is a song composed by Charles Fox with lyrics by Norman Gimbel. The song was written in collaboration with Lori Lieberman, who recorded the song in late 1971. It was a number-one hit in 1973 for Roberta Flack. The song has since been covered by numerous artists.


  21. Unforgettable

    Unforgettable (1954)

    595 views

    Unforgettable is a popular song written by Irving Gordon. The song's original working title was Uncomparable. The music publishing company asked Irving to change it to Unforgettable. The song was published in 1951.


  22. Send In The Clowns

    Send In The Clowns (1975)

    543 views

    "Send in the Clowns" is a song written by Stephen Sondheim for the 1973 musical A Little Night Music, an adaptation of Ingmar Bergman's film Smiles of a Summer Night. It is a ballad from Act II in which the character Desirée reflects on the ironies and disappointments of her life. Among other things, she looks back on an affair years earlier with the lawyer Fredrik. Meeting him after so long, she finds that he is now in an unconsummated marriage with a much younger woman. Desirée proposes marriage to rescue him from this situation, but he declines, citing his dedication to his bride. Reacting to his rejection, Desirée sings this song. The song is later reprised as a coda after Fredrik's young wife runs away with his son, and Fredrik is finally free to accept Desirée's offer.


  23. The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face

    The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face (1999)

    535 views

    "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" is a 1957 folk song written by British political singer/songwriter Ewan MacColl for Peggy Seeger, who would later become his wife, to sing. At the time the couple were lovers, although MacColl was married to someone else. Seeger sang the song when the duo performed in folk clubs around Britain. During the 1960s, it was recorded by various folk singers and became a major international hit for Roberta Flack in 1972, winning the Grammy Award for Record of the Year.


  24. We Are The World

    We Are The World (1992)

    513 views

    "We Are the World" is a song and charity single originally recorded by the supergroup USA for Africa in 1985. It was written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie, and produced by Quincy Jones and Michael Omartian for the album We Are the World. With sales in excess of 20 million copies, it is one of the fewer than thirty all-time singles to have sold 10 million (or more) copies worldwide.


  25. You've Got A Friend!

    You've Got A Friend! (1972)

    489 views

    "You've Got a Friend" is a song from 1971, written by Carole King, and included in her album Tapestry and James Taylor's album Mud Slide Slim, which were recorded simultaneously in 1971 with shared musicians. Taylor's version was released as a single, and reached number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 4 on the UK Singles Chart.


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