Republican heads of state of France

Posted 3 years ago by Kiwigirl15
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  1. Nicolas Sarkozy

    Nicolas Sarkozy


    Nicolas Sarkozy (born Nicolas Paul Stéphane Sarközy de Nagy-Bocsa; 28 January 1955) is a French politician who served as the 23rd President of France from 16 May 2007 until 15 May 2012.

  2. Jacques Chirac

    Jacques Chirac


    Jacques René Chirac (ʒɑːk ʃɨˈræk; born 29 November 1932) is a French statesman, who served as the 22nd President of France from 1995 to 2007. He previously served as Prime Minister of France from 1974 to 1976 and from 1986 to 1988 (making him the only person to hold the position of Prime Minister twice under the Fifth Republic), and as Mayor of Paris from 1977 to 1995.

  3. Charles de Gaulle

    Charles de Gaulle


    Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle (22 November 1890 – 9 November 1970) was a French general, resistant, writer and statesman. He was the leader of Free France (1940–44) and the head of the Provisional Government of the French Republic (1944–46). In 1958, he founded the Fifth Republic and was elected as the 18th President of France, until his resignation in 1969. He was the dominant figure of France during the Cold War era and his memory continues to influence French politics.

  4. François Hollande

    François Hollande


    François Gérard Georges Nicolas Hollande (born 12 August 1954) is a French politician. He has been the President of France since 2012.

  5. Napoléon Bonaparte

    Napoléon Bonaparte


    Napoléon Bonaparte (nəˈpliən, -ˈpljən; born Napoleone di Buonaparte; 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French military and political leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and its associated wars. As Napoleon I, he was Emperor of the French from 1804 until 1814, and again in 1815. Napoleon dominated European affairs for nearly two decades while leading France against a series of coalitions in the Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars. He won several of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, rapidly conquering most of continental Europe before his ultimate defeat in 1815. One of the greatest commanders in history, his campaigns are studied at military schools worldwide and he remains one of the most celebrated and controversial political figures in Western history. In civil affairs, Napoleon implemented foundational liberal reforms in France and across Europe. He established a system of public education, abolished the vestiges of feudalism, emancipated Jews and other religious minorities, enacted legal protections for an emerging middle class, and centralized state power at the expense of religious authorities. His lasting legal achievement, the Napoleonic Code, has been adopted by dozens of nations around the world.

  6. Valéry Giscard d'Estaing

    Valéry Giscard d'Estaing


    Valéry Marie René Georges Giscard d'Estaing (born 2 February 1926), also known as Giscard or VGE, is a French centrist politician and a member of the Constitutional Council of France. He served as President of the French Republic from 1974 until 1981.

  7. François Mitterrand

    François Mitterrand


    François Maurice Adrien Marie Mitterrand (26 October 1916 – 8 January 1996) was a French statesman, who served as the 21st President of France, serving from 1981 until 1995. He is the longest-serving President of France and, as leader of the Socialist Party, the first figure from the left elected President under the Fifth Republic.

  8. Napoleon III

    Napoleon III


    Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (20 April 1808 – 9 January 1873) was the first President of the French Second Republic and, as Napoleon III, the Emperor of the Second French Empire. He was the nephew and heir of Napoleon I. He was the first President of France to be elected by a direct popular vote. However, when he was blocked by the Constitution and Parliament from running for a second term, he organized a coup d'état in 1851, and then took the throne as Napoleon III on 2 December 1852, the forty-eighth anniversary of Napoleon I's coronation.

  9. Raymond Poincaré

    Raymond Poincaré


    Raymond Poincaré (20 August 1860 – 15 October 1934) was a French statesman who served three times as Prime Minister of France, and as President of France from 1913 to 1920. He was a conservative leader, primarily committed to political and social stability.

  10. Philippe Pétain

    Philippe Pétain


    Henri Philippe Benoni Omer Joseph Pétain (24 April 1856 – 23 July 1951), generally known as Philippe Pétain Marshal Pétain (Maréchal Pétain or The Lion of Verdun), was a French general who reached the distinction of Marshal of France, and was later Chief of State of Vichy France (Chef de l'État Français), from 1940 to 1944. Pétain, who was 84 years old in 1940, ranks as France's oldest head of state.

  11. Adolphe Thiers

    Adolphe Thiers


    Marie Joseph Louis Adolphe Thiers (15 April 1797 – 3 September 1877) was a French politician and historian. He was a leading historian of the French Revolution, with a multivolume history that argued that the republicanism of the Revolution was the central theme of modern French history.

  12. Georges Pompidou

    Georges Pompidou


    Georges Jean Raymond Pompidou (5 July 1911 – 2 April 1974) was Prime Minister of France from 1962 to 1968 - the longest tenure in the position's history - and later President of the French Republic from 1969 until his death in 1974. He had long been a top aide for president Charles de Gaulle. As president, he was a moderate conservative who restored diplomatic relations with the United States, and maintained positive relations with the newly-independent former colonies in Africa.

  13. Albert François Lebrun

    Albert François Lebrun


    Albert François Lebrun (29 August 1871 – 6 March 1950) was a French politician, President of France from 1932 to 1940. He was the last president of the Third Republic. He was a member of the center-right Democratic Republican Alliance (ARD).

  14. Leon Blum

    Leon Blum


    André Léon Blum ([ˈɑ̃.dʁe ˌle.ɔ̃ ˈblym]; 9 April 1872 – 30 March 1950) was a French politician, identified with the moderate left, and three times Prime Minister of France. As a Jew, he was heavily influenced by the Dreyfus affair of the late 19th century. He became a disciple and after 1914 the successor to the French Socialist leader Jean Jaurès. Blum rejected the class conflict model of Marxist socialism, instead defining socialism as the highest use of the power of the state, under the guidance of well-educated experts like himself, "to define, protect, and guarantee the condition of the working class." As Prime Minister in a "Popular Front" government of the left 1936-37, he provided a series of major economic reforms. Blum declared neutrality in the Spanish Civil War (1936-39) to avoid the civil conflict spilling over into France itself. Once out of office in 1938, he denounced the appeasement of Germany. When Germany defeated France in 1940, he became a staunch opponent of Vichy France. As a Jew, he was imprisoned in concentration camps. After the war he resumed a leadership role in French politics until his death in 1950.

  15. Jacques-Charles Dupont de l'Eure

    Jacques-Charles Dupont de l'Eure


    Jacques-Charles Dupont de l'Eure (27 February 1767 – 3 March 1855) was a French lawyer and statesman.

  16. Marie François Sadi Carnot

    Marie François Sadi Carnot


    Marie François Sadi Carnot (11 August 1837 – 25 June 1894) was a French statesman and the fourth president of the Third Republic. He served as the President of France from 1887 until his assassination in 1894.

  17. Rene Coty

    Rene Coty


    René Jules Gustave Coty (20 March 1882 – 22 November 1962) was President of France from 1954 to 1959. He was the second and last president of the Fourth French Republic.

  18. Félix Gouin

    Félix Gouin


    Félix Gouin (1884–1977) was a French Socialist politician, member of the French Section of the Workers' International (SFIO).

  19. Patrice de Mac-Mahon, Duke of Magenta

    Patrice de Mac-Mahon, Duke of Magenta


    Marshal Marie Esme Patrice Maurice de MacMahon, 1st Duke of Magenta (13 June 1808 – 17 October 1893), was a French general and politician with the distinction Marshal of France. He served as Chief of State of France from 1873 to 1875 and as the second president of the Third Republic, from 1875 to 1879. He won national renown and the presidency on the basis of his military actions in the war against the Germans. The man was a devout conservative Catholic, a traditionalist who despised socialism and strongly distrusted the secular Republicans. He took very seriously his duty as the neutral guardian of the Constitution, and rejected suggestions of a monarchist coup d'état. He also refused to meet with Gambetta, the leader of the Republicans. He moved the Third Republic the system whereby the government selected by the assembly ruled France, but he also insisted on an upper chamber. At one point he overstepped his authority and dissolved the Chamber of Deputies, with the result that Republicans won the election and McMahon soon resigned and retired to private life.

  20. Félix Faure

    Félix Faure


    Félix François Faure (30 January 1841 – 16 February 1899) was President of France from 1895 until his death in 1899.

  21. Jules Armand Dufaure

    Jules Armand Dufaure


    Jules Armand Stanislas Dufaure (4 December 1798 – 28 June 1881) was a French statesman.

  22. Alain Poher

    Alain Poher


    Alain Émile Louis Marie Poher (17 April 1909 – 9 December 1996) was a French centrist politician, affiliated first with the Popular Republican Movement and later with the Democratic Centre. He served as a Senator for Val-de-Marne from 1946 to 1995. He was President of the Senate from 3 October 1968 to 1 October 1992 and, in that capacity, served twice as the country's interim president. Candidate in the 1969 presidential election, he was defeated by Georges Pompidou in the second round.

  23. Frédéric François-Marsal

    Frédéric François-Marsal


    Frédéric François-Marsal (1874–1958) was a French Politician of the Third Republic, who served briefly as Prime Minister in 1924. Due to his premiership he also served for two days (11–13 June 1924) as the Acting President of the French Republic between resignation of Alexandre Millerand and election of Gaston Doumergue.

  24. Alexandre Millerand

    Alexandre Millerand


    Alexandre Millerand (1859–1943) was a French politician. He was Prime Minister of France 20 January to 23 September 1920 and President of France from 23 September 1920 to 11 June 1924. His participation in Waldeck-Rousseau's cabinet at the start of the 20th century, alongside the marquis de Galliffet who had directed the repression of the 1871 Paris Commune, sparked a debate in the French Section of the Workers' International (SFIO) and in the Second International about the participation of socialists in "bourgeois governments".

  25. Jules Grévy

    Jules Grévy


    François Paul Jules Grévy (15 August 1807 – 9 September 1891) was a President of the French Third Republic and one of the leaders of the Opportunist Republicans faction. Given that his predecessors were monarchists who tried without success to restore the French monarchy, Grévy is seen as the first real republican President of France.

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